Narrative elaboration makes misinformation and corrective information regarding COVID-19 more believable

Joanna Greer*, Kaitlyn Fitzgerald, Santosh Vijaykumar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

People gather information about health topics from online channels oftentimes awash with misinformation. Investigating this problem during the COVID-19 pandemic is important, as the misinformation effect occurs when misleading details are embedded in narratives and questions. This pilot study investigated whether narrative elaboration increases believability in misinformation statements about COVID-19, and willingness to share these statements online. Results from our online survey (n = 80) demonstrated that narrative elaboration increased believability in both misinformation and accurate statements, with a more pronounced effect on younger adults. Future research may investigate cognitive vulnerabilities imposed by elaborate narratives embedded in online health misinformation with increased attention on developing misinformation resilience among younger adults.
Original languageEnglish
Article number235
Number of pages5
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jun 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Narrative elaboration makes misinformation and corrective information regarding COVID-19 more believable'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this